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The Thailand you’ve always known – Part 2

May 23, 2010 2 comments

Regarding my AUA Thai Program Blog, The Thailand you’ve always known, a friend commented, “The following article takes a VERY different perspective. I hope your perspective is the right one.

Time will tell. (No pun intended.)” http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1990640,00.html

Interestingly, I don’t find what I am saying to be at odds with the Times article above.  Typical of most non-Thai views it regards the issues the surround the conflicts as things that must be corrected. Issues like freedom of speech, institutions, military, etc. The problem here is that these institutions exist because they are still needed. To abolish them for the sake of Western styled democracy would be suicidal for Thailand. The present government appears to know this.

Thailand’s majority have historically viewed government as ‘masters’ – ‘elder’ government if you will. In most democracies, the government exists to represent, indeed serve the people. If this becomes the case in Thailand, it will require a major value shift, and one that Thai people are not likely to make soon. (see Elders below) If the comparison can be made, and I think it’s a fair comparison, the majority of Thailand politically is comparable to children growing up. They have needed and still do need their parents.

Have the parents become institutionalized? Of course.

Is that holding back some things? Of course.

Is that adding stability to the country? Yes, and No.

In order for the Thai majority to take the reigns of government they must win the confidence of the parents. This will not happen by the sort of demonstrations that have just occurred. It must happen in a united way. Nearly every Thai/family owned business as well as many Thai run, non-family businesses I know of are like a microcosm of the country in this regard. And there seem to no end of cases where the parents did in fact, turn over the control to the 30 and 40 year old children, only to have the business destroyed in a very few years.

The institutions and government that many are so quick to criticize are the very thing maintaining stability here. While the damage done last week is undoubtedly the most costly in terms of dollars, in terms of lives, it was extremely low. This points to the true values of the Thai and is something that most developed countries could learn a great deal from. Businesses will be rebuilt, money will be made again, and when it comes down to it, the real hardships from it all will rest on the poor who like teenagers in rebellion, are gaining a foothold in the political process. They’re just not there yet. I for one, want to see that growth continue – but I don’t think it would be wise for it to happen overnight. What won’t be recovered are the lives which have been lost. Most of these deaths seem to be caused neither by the government nor the redshirts who are seeking a voice, but by a few who are apparently using all sides as fronts to gain power. This too, is a product of transition from the old ways to democratic government, which can only move forward through education, and increased maturity of the majority – a growth process which takes time.

Elders

One of the great underlying values of the Thai is that of honoring the elder. This lies as as deeply as any value the Thai hold, and is one of the obstacles to a Western style democracy. Rightly so.

Historically, it has always been the family elders who have had the final say. The social fabric was held together by this. As larger governments have emerged, this is still the case. The fact is, the majority of the people still look to age as deserving the final say and this cuts across every faction in the demonstrations. One can only begin to imagine the internal conflict in the hearts and minds of many Thai at the moment.  (In addition to age, wealth has also had it’s place in offering respect. Perhaps the greatest thing that Thaksin did for Thailand was help the Thai see that riches is not a good reason to necessarily respect a person or give them more credit that others with less means. I’d guess that never again will Thais readily be influenced heavily by a candidate’s wealth.) The upshot of this is that as elders involved in politics, it’s important to listen and go along with what they say. This underlies the institutions that are in question and is one of the redshirts major issues.

As I said previously, I think that this is a balance for Thais to determine. Ssecondly, it’s a balance that can only be found over time. For those of us who live here and have been taken with the charms of this people, let’s give them the space and time to find that balance. Let’s also understand together that this place is everything it is because of the values of the Thai people.

Read Part 1 at : http://auathai.wordpress.com/2010/05/22/the-thailand-you-have-always-known/

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Red Shirts and Yellow Shirts – How will this end?

March 14, 2010 Leave a comment

I don’t know about you, but if you’re in Thailand, you’re probably getting asked this question as much as I am.  Most of the people I know don’t really define themselves as either Red or Yellow.  Most of the people I know, wish that we could just have nice, quiet coups without all the publicity, which by every account, has hurt Thailand considerably.  It’s not that people don’t care that business interests are suffering – it’s more like there simply seems to be no way forward that’s positive.

As in other places in the world, the whole situation lacks real leadership and direction.  (Perhaps in this sense, the government is truly representative of the people.)  Or perhaps, and I think more likely, this situation needs a different sort of solution, one that cannot really be provided by politics.

Everyone seems to want democracy – but everyone it would seem, realizes what with the social, educational, and class differences among the constituents, a representative government is unlikely.  Not to over-simplify things, but it’s not dissimilar to an imagined representative process where the majority of the voters were 16 year olds, while the minority were 70 year olds.  The minority has held the reigns of power (i.e. money) and all of a sudden, the 16 year olds have found their voice.  Among his many other successes and failures, Thaksin gave the kids a voice.

The problem as I see it is this: While we may hope that the Red Shirts will slowly lose their ability to gather together, and Thaksin may lose his ability to support them, this is a dangerous game to play.  Ideas don’t die so easily.  Sooner or later, new leaders emerge.

It’s not hard to see that the present powers that be, don’t really represent the poor and less well-educated of the country. (notice I’m not saying repressed.) [In their own view, Thaksin was the first major politician to extend a ‘helping hand’ to the poor majority.  We could all debate whether his motives were to help the poor or not, and whether what he did actually helped anything – many families have become destitute because of the loans that couldn’t be repaid.]  But as a scenario, is there any leader among the Red Shirts including Thaksin, who could possibly bring together a government which is representative of the business and economic interests of the nation?  (notice I’m not saying majority.)  [And here lies the democracy problem.  Who possibly favors allowing the 16 year olds to control finance, foreign policy, national security, etc.?]

We currently have two ways of seeing things, that are held apart from each other by virture of education, knowledge, and experience.  If there was some way to educate, and bring the majority of Thai people up to the levels of the Yellow Shirts, democracy might work better. By levels, I don’t mean higher in any moral sense, simply more advanced due to broader experience, opportunity, education, money, etc.  This is the vital difference between the young and the old.  Thailand doesn’t do retirement very well.  We value our aged.  But this can also be extremely stifling.  And on occasion, splits occur.

What is needed here is a bridge, or better yet, many bridges that will span the gaps between the Red and Yellow factions.  Today, Thonburi is nearly non-existent as a unique and different place from Bangkok – it has been so integrated mainly due to the bridges across the Chao Phraya River.   But where the bridges might come from in order to span the gaps between the Red and Yellow is anyone’s guess, but they must ideally be built from the power base to the disenfranchised – and here too, leadership appears to be lacking.

Thinking out loud, I wonder if business people, all of who suffer from the current state of dysfunction, could develop a plan to make the needed bridges.  While a return on investment in the poorer communities may not make great business sense, it makes great social sense.  It might also do wonders to alleviate the political divide that is costing business so much today.

I imagine people commenting at this point – something down the lines of how long such a strategy would take and how expensive it would be.  I agree, it could only happen little by little over a period of time, before the lasting results would be understood completely, but I also know that this problem of Red and Yellow isn’t going to end with the demonstrations this weekend – and frankly, from the business perspective, it’s costing too much already.

Last year I visited Taiwan.  I spoke with friends about the tensions between the mainland and their country.  Those tensions are lessening, little by little, because of investment between the countries.  If the Thai government created incentives for businessmen to invest in the poorer communities, much could happen quickly.  It wouldn’t take too long before the knowledge and experience would be there in a way that everyone could finally wear new shirts with new colors.  Then, and not before, will Thailand find the means to a representative government.

My experience learning Thai the ALG way

December 3, 2009 4 comments

I was 26 years old when I entered the Thai Program at AUA in September of 1987.  I’d just moved into a house on Ladphrao Rd – a large private home with a large yard ant it took about 45 minutes one way to get to school.  The greatest difficulty I had in learning Thai was navigating the traffic!

I had chosen AUA because they were then, and still are, the only school who offers something besides the traditional programs that I had always failed miserably in.  As as student, I hated being put on the spot – even when I knew the answer (which on occasion I did!) So when I found AUA, it didn’t take much to convince me to give it a year.  If it didn’t work – well I could always enroll in a traditional, ‘practice makes perfect’ sort of program.

The difference of AUA was that we didn’t really study.  My job as a student was to take in whatever they served up – and they served up a whole lot!  This wasn’t just a language school!  The job of the teachers was to keep us entertained and interested in whatever they could think up to do or talk about.  They were a very imaginative bunch of people.  By the end of my first class, I was thinking to myself that if all the classes were like this one, I was going to really enjoy language ‘study’ for the first time in my life.  I did too!

It wasn’t all easy, especially at first.  I was worried, mostly due to conditioning from schools and teachers, that I might not be doing very well.  Was I doing as well as other students?  Was I progressing as I should be? Without tests, how could you tell?  It didn’t take very long before I realized that I was going to need to adjust to a few more things than smog, traffic, spicy food and life as an illiterate.

There were 18 students in my group – we all began level 1 at the same time.  By the time I reached level 9 (the end at the time which also included a few classes based on ideas we had offered) there were 5 of us left.  Beginning with level 1, students who were from all over the world, walks of life, and intellects, knew more than the founder of the program, Dr. J. Marvin Brown.  Dr. Brown was a well known linguist and physicist and to date, one of the most humble and intelligent people I have ever met.  I figured that probably he knew more about language learning than my student peers – most of whom were fluent in about 1 language.

So I got to talking to Brown.  He was a great listener, and during my first three months of classes, I visited him a few times.  How am I doing?  How does he know?  And while I didn’t get the sort of answers I was looking for, I got the answers I needed. Things like…

“…tests can’t really tell us how you’re doing.”
“…comparing yourself to other students in the class doesn’t really make any sense.”
“…look inside and tell me what’s happening.”

When I asked him if I was doing what I was supposed to he asked me what I was doing.  I tried doing what he told me – that was to “sit back, and figure out as best I could what was going on.” and “Guess.” and “Don’t worry about what you’re hearing”.

This mindset took me three months to settle into – and once that happened, I’ve never wanted to settle out of this mode!  This mode of learning has been and continues to give me life’s greatest moments and experiences.

It also seems to be a mode of existence that many adults struggle with.  We want to latch onto things, nail them down clearly, and then say we know a certain thing. (more on this in a blog at a later time.)  With this program I couldn’t do it.  I came away each day, with a whole lot of experiences, but unable to say I’d learned even a single word!  Wasn’t I supposed to be learning words?  No!  Dr. Brown, or Marv as he preferred to be called by friends, explained it to me something like this… Words, grammar, and all other ‘parts’ of language come from our experiences. In order to make a word, your brain needs the sounds of that language.  Where does it get the sounds?  From your experiences.  In order to make a sentence, your brain needs the grammar of that language.  Where does it get the grammar?  From experiences.  So I settled in and just collected the experiences.

It has been 22 years since that time.  I have never once regretted a moment I spent at AUA.  The fact is, language is a by-product of what they gave me.  That one year of entertainment was without question, the greatest educational year of my life!

What "Freedoms" are we fighting for????

November 18, 2009 Leave a comment

I grew up being taught that two wrongs don’t make a right.

Next month I’ll be 48.  I get interested whenever I hear people who are half my age, praising the US military for protecting their freedom.  It’s even more interesting when “Christian” freedom is brought in to the mix… sort of like a double whammy! 

Having lived abroad for over 20 years and it’s natural I suppose, that a different perspective would offer a different conclusions – but I wonder what exactly, these people mean when they use the word “freedom”

I’m curious to understand what freedoms a twenty or thirty year old might feel that the US military has protected for them during the past 20 years. 

Perhaps it’s the freedom to take away a citizen’s life and rights just because they might be a threat. As a nation over the past Bush administration, we’ve just come through one of the greatest subversions of freedom for the average citizen of any nation in the world!

Perhaps it’s the freedom to live in luxury while mcu of the world suffers.  That is the conclusion that many have drawn from US involvement in the US/Iraqi war – “We must protect our way of life!” (Which means we must protect our oil supplies.)  At least this is consistent with the majority of rich people everywhere.  I don’t exclude myself in saying this, but wealth inevitably shelters the wealthy from the less privileged.  It’s easiest if we don’t have to see it all and for sure, we don’t have to do anything about what we don’t know is there.

Or perhaps they’re referring to the freedom to attack at will, any country we think might be a threat against us in some way. Who cares that there was no evidence in the end – “it was a corrupt administration anyway!” (someone actually told me this.) If the future stays true to the past, the US military, political, and economic  involvement in Iraq will prove to be the greatest, continued, destabilizing force in that country’s development and progress.

Yet again, perhaps it’s the freedom to continue living in fear, and gaining a sense of security from the presence of a strong and aggressive military.  In the old American West, pioneer families loved the strong, hard fighting men – because they provided protection against the native people.  I wonder how many people died needlessly, simply due to a lack of respect and understanding – a lack of awareness of what they were doing and how they were viewed by those native Americans?

It seems to me that the last thirty years of US military policy has been about the same as that of the old West fighting men – “shoot first, ask questions later”.

When we will ever realize that there are better ways than fighting?
When will we ever become aware?

This blog is represents the views and opinions of David – only and is not necessarily representative of any organization or affiliate.

Categories: freedom, society, war

Taking advantage of others

August 23, 2009 Leave a comment

There seems to be a prevailing emphasis these days in our popular culture to take every advantage of others possible. From my viewpoint, this is most evident in sexuality and business. It is perhaps common these days, to see members of the opposite sex as “sexual objects”.

People are not physical, spiritual, and emotional beings in separate, compartmental ways. We are the integration of these – Love honors the whole person in every way.

Let

February 17, 2009 Leave a comment

Such a small, huge word, ‘let’! I am still learning its meaning. The areas of life that this concept applies to seem endless.

Our whole society seems to work on the wrong side of things. We want to prohibit things people want to do and make people do things that they don’t want to!

Think about education. People are born to learn – wanting to know is like wanting to eat! The question I have is this – What are you learning. Normally what we’re learning and what’s being taught us are two different things. Understanding this can place us on the right side of things.

Democracy

November 7, 2008 Leave a comment

Democracy fails, not because it doesn’t work at all, but because it instills individualism without responsibility. Only when individuals realize that the personal needs of others are also their own responsibility will we see a system of government emerge that makes more sense. Rather than every man for himself, it will be every life for the life of all.